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Resource Classes let you categorize — or class — your resources.  Resource classes are important for two reasons:

  • For Reporting: Grouping of resources into a class for reporting. For example, you can create an Equipment class called Light Machinery, and report on all assets within that class. 
  • For Billing of Time and Materials projects:  Billing rates are applied to a resource class. For example, you can create a billable resource class called Project Managers, and apply a single billing rate to that class. All resources included in this resource class are then charged out at one single billing rate.

You can create, edit, and delete unlimited labor, equipment and materials classes to which you can assign resources and billing rates.

A tip to keep in mind, when thinking about Resources and Resource Classes is:

Resources are people, items of equipment or materials:  example, Bernadette.  Resources have cost rates assigned to them, and generate cost in your project estimates and timesheet transactions.

Resource Classes are groupings or roles: example, Project Manager.  Every Resource must have a Resource Class assignment.  Resource Classes have billing rates assigned to them, and generate revenue in your project estimates and timesheet transactions.

For example, John Smith is a Project Manager.  John has a cost rate of $75.00 assigned to him as a Resource, and a billing rate of $150.00 assigned to his Resource Class of Project Manager. 

 

 

 

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